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Where to relocate in 2021

When it comes to ‘freedom of movement’, 2021 and the post-Brexit world will be very different to the one we have been used to. So where should you be looking to move in 2021?

When it comes to ‘freedom of movement’, 2021 and the post-Brexit world will be very different to the one we have been used to. So where should you be looking to move in 2021? Christopher Nye, editor at the overseas homes and relocation website Property Guides, suggests three exciting options.

From 1st January 2021, if you wish to spend more than three months out of every six in a European country you will need to apply for a visa.

Most EU countries have a relatively simple retirement or ‘non-lucrative visa’ for people who don’t need to work. You will need to show a minimum income and have comprehensive health insurance for a visa like this, but with a little determination it is easily possible. Indeed, many countries want British retirees to move there and offer inducements. 

Currently, many countries are restricting arrivals from non-citizens. But when the gates reopen, we know that there is huge pent-up demand to try something new and bold in life. In our 2020 Property Guides survey we asked if Covid had made people more or less likely to move abroad in the future, and by a ration of 4:1 you were more eager to move.

Here are three great options for relocating in 2021.

Greece

If the Durrell family could do it, why not you? The heart-warming ITV series The Durrells, based on real life, showed both the positives and the stresses of starting a new life abroad, as an English widow swapped cramped, dreary and drizzly Bournemouth for sexy, sun-drenched Corfu.

For younger people, getting a work visa in 2021 will be problematic. But Greece is welcoming international retirees though a new tax scheme, as well as a golden visa.

Property prices are starting to rise following a decade of up to 50% falls, so is a great time to buy a Mediterranean home at a fraction of the cost of a Spanish island.

Portugal

There are two types of expatriate moving to Portugal: old and young. Or at least, 30-something versus 60-something.

The exciting cities of Lisbon and Porto have become high-tech hubs, attracting new, digital start-up companies to trendy neighbourhoods. You can buy a modern apartment here, in communities with shared areas for socialising and flexible workspaces. It’s the home of the ‘digital nomad’, those who can work anywhere in the world as long as they can plug in a laptop and get decent Wi-Fi (and coffee).

For the retired, the Algarve is still top choice. A healthy, outdoorsy retirement in warm temperatures and twice the sunshine hours of the UK beckons. Portugal also has a golden visa and retirement tax scheme. Check out more at Property Guides Portugal.

New Zealand

There has been a surge in interest to move to New Zealand. Well, who wouldn’t want Jacinda Ardern as Prime Minister after she kept Covid-related deaths to fewer than 1% of the average in the UK?

There’s more to New Zealand than that. The thing about New Zealand is all the space. It has 19 people per square kilometre compared to 432 in England.

Moreover, given that many of us will be working from home, you might like to know that new homes built in New Zealand in 2010 averaged 200 square metres. And in the UK: just 76!

Wherever you fancy, planning your great escape is simply a matter of taking it one simple step at a time. Start by downloading your blueprint for a move from Property Guides.

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